This lot from Rungeto smallholders demonstrates tea like clarity and a blackcurrant character.

We were looking to work with a Kenyan that demonstrated a great level of clarity and balance, a refined example that boasts a chocolatey character, rather than savoury notes often found amongst Kenyans.

We are excited to work with coffee from the Kii factory this year. The meticulous attention to detail at this farm is admirable and the results speak for themselves, tasting of dark chocolate and honey.

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Producers Notes

The Kii factory is located in Ngairiama in the Gichugu division of Kirinyaga district in Central Province. It is one of 3 factories, along with Kiangoi and Karimikui, which make up the Rungeto Farmers Coop Society. This coop was established in 1953 and now has around 3507 members. Each smallholder member has around a hectare of land for growing coffee alongside vegetables for the family. The area has rich and fertile red volcanic soil at altitudes of 1700 to 1900 metres above sea level and receives between 1600 and 1900mm of rainfall annually.

The coffee is handpicked by the smallholder members and delivered to the Kii factory where it is pulped. This initially separates the dense beans from the immature ‘mbuni’s (floaters) using water floatation which means the denser beans will sink and be sent through channels to the fermentation tank. This first stage of fermentation will last for around 24 hours, after which the beans are washed and sent to the secondary fermentation tank for another 12-24 hours.

Once the fermentation process is completed, the beans enter the washing channels where floaters are separated further and the dense beans are cleaned of mucilage. The washed beans will then enter soaking tanks where they can sit under clean water for as long as another 24 hours. This soaking process allows amino acids and proteins in the cellular structure of each bean to develop which results in higher levels of acidity and complex fruit flavours in the cup - it is thought that this process of soaking contributes to the flavour profiles that Kenyan coffees are so famed for.

The beans are then transferred to the initial drying tables where they are laid in a thin layer to allow around 50% of the moisture to be quickly removed. This first stage of drying can last around 6 hours before the beans are gathered and laid in thicker layers for the remaining 5-10 days of the drying period. The dry parchment coffee is then delivered to a private mill and put into ‘bodegas’ to rest – these are raised cells made of chicken wire which allows the coffee to breathe fully.

Production Data

Producer

Region

Altitude

Varietal

Harvest

Process

Rungeto Smallholders

Kyrinyaga County

1600-1800 masl

SL28, SL34

December 2020

Washed

Resting Coffee

Carbon dioxide is a result of chemical reactions taking place throughout the roasting process. The gas becomes caught up within the core of the bean and will release over time. When it comes to brewing coffee, carbon dioxide will lead to the formation of carbonic acid, a sharp and unpleasant flavour in the cup.

We recommend keeping your coffee sealed in it's bag for a minimum of 21 days before espresso brewing or at least 7 days for filter brewing.